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Incorporating novel ecosystems into management frameworks, 2013


Hulvey, K.B., Standish, R.J., Hallett, L.M., Staromski, B.M., Murphy, S.D., Nelson, C.R., Gardener, M.R., Kennedy, P.L., Seastedt, T.R., Suding, K.N.


Novel Ecosystems. Intervening in the new ecological world order., R. J. Hobbs, E. Higgs, C. Hall, Wiley-Blackwell, West Sussex, UK :157-171
DOI: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch18
NWT Accession Number: NWT1915

Abstract

How might the existence of hybrid and novel ecosystems alter ecosystem management? Non-native species invasions, climate change, pollution and land development all are creating ecosystems that consist of new combinations of species, and often have altered functioning and structure. A common goal in ecosystem management is to maintain native populations and traditional functions by removing the species, disturbances and conditions that lead to degradation (Grumbine 1997), and thus return ecosystems to their pre-disturbance trajectories or states. The emergence of novel ecosystems forces managers to reconsider this paradigm because, at times, no amount of management action will reverse ecological changes. New management goals may continue to recognize the value of protecting species and ecosystem processes, although they might not include continuity with the historical system. In these cases, managers might choose to utilize non-traditional or alternative management strategies derived through a broad suite of planning tools to reach management goals. This chapter aims to provide a framework that helps managers, whether scientists or stewards, navigate the decisions that lead to new management approaches in hybrid and novel ecosystems. We first present a decision-making flowchart (Fig. 18.1) that can be used as a roadmap to navigate possible management actions. We also explore the role of both ecological and social barriers in the creation and maintenance of hybrid and novel ecosystems (Fig. 18.2). Finally, five case studies (Chapters 19–23) highlight examples of challenging decision points (Box 18.1) which managers will likely face as they work to incorporate hybrid and novel ecosystems into strategies for restoration, conservation and management. 

Keywords

ecosystem management, ecological change, native species, hybrid ecosystems, novel ecosystems, conservation, restoration, social barriers

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Socio-ecological systemsPlant/vegetation ecologyAnimal ecology

Citation

Hulvey, K.B., Standish, R.J., Hallett, L.M., Staromski, B.M., Murphy, S.D., Nelson, C.R., Gardener, M.R., Kennedy, P.L., Seastedt, T.R., Suding, K.N., (2013) Incorporating novel ecosystems into management frameworks. Novel Ecosystems. Intervening in the new ecological world order., R. J. Hobbs, E. Higgs, C. Hall, Wiley-Blackwell, West Sussex, UK :157-171 , DOI: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch18

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This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement #DEB-1637686. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the material are those of the author(s) and do not necesarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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